AccueilAccueil  CalendrierCalendrier  FAQFAQ  RechercherRechercher  S'enregistrerS'enregistrer  MembresMembres  GroupesGroupes  ConnexionConnexion  

Partagez | 
 

 Nouvelle interview

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
Aller à la page : Précédent  1, 2, 3
AuteurMessage
magnum opus
Track: Power and Glory
Track: Power and Glory
avatar

Nombre de messages : 1439
Age : 43
Localisation : bordeaux
Date d'inscription : 04/07/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Nouvelle interview   Sam 24 Jan 2009 - 20:20

il y a des choses intéressantes, comme apprendre qu'il a enregistré totalement dix chansons qui ne sont pas sur l'album. c'est marrant de voir comment il a cessé de boire aussi... j'espère juste qu'il ne promet rien en l'air en parlant de coffrets et de ressorties de disques, et que ce sera vraiment intéressant.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur https://www.facebook.com/gauthiergallais.auteur
Invité
Invité



MessageSujet: Re: Nouvelle interview   Mar 3 Fév 2009 - 21:05

Des histoires de thunes pour le JCVD du hard "j'veux mon pognon!"
Finalement il a eu 820 000 $ de dommages, de quoi bien aider pour la suite de son label Smile


http://www.nypost.com/seven/02022009/news/nationalnews/guitar_god_gets_820g_feedback_153165.htm
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
magnum opus
Track: Power and Glory
Track: Power and Glory
avatar

Nombre de messages : 1439
Age : 43
Localisation : bordeaux
Date d'inscription : 04/07/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Nouvelle interview   Mar 3 Fév 2009 - 23:26

en 2000, il disait que Lewis lui avait volé 4,5 millions. même s'il a récupéré un bout, il en manque plus de 80%. Enfin, je m'en contenterais bien déjà!
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur https://www.facebook.com/gauthiergallais.auteur
tonton J. franck
Track: Angel of love
Track: Angel of love
avatar

Nombre de messages : 3538
Age : 46
Localisation : entre Fés et Reykjavik
Date d'inscription : 24/12/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Nouvelle interview   Mar 3 Fév 2009 - 23:53

C'est ce que je me demandais aussi. Y'a encore un sacré manque à gagner.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://lazizikatonton.blogspot.com/
Invité
Invité



MessageSujet: Re: Nouvelle interview   Mer 4 Fév 2009 - 1:00

le Dragon Fire Online février 2009 en PDF est disponible ici:
http://www.savefile.com/downloadmax/1993537

Bonne lecture à tous!
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Nau J. Nau
Track: Angel of love
Track: Angel of love
avatar

Nombre de messages : 3858
Age : 40
Localisation : Ajaccio
Date d'inscription : 09/01/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Nouvelle interview   Mer 4 Fév 2009 - 12:01

thanks!

_________________
under Yngwie’s masterful guidance !!!
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://nausica75.muxtape.com/
magnum opus
Track: Power and Glory
Track: Power and Glory
avatar

Nombre de messages : 1439
Age : 43
Localisation : bordeaux
Date d'inscription : 04/07/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Nouvelle interview   Mer 4 Fév 2009 - 18:28

Merci! Masi comme d'habitude, c'est un peu vide. L'histoire du vol, par contre, mériterait beaucoup d'explications, car le comptable d'Yngwie me parait bien mouillé également. Comment dissimuler 5 millions de dollars en cinq ans au fisc?????
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur https://www.facebook.com/gauthiergallais.auteur
Nau J. Nau
Track: Angel of love
Track: Angel of love
avatar

Nombre de messages : 3858
Age : 40
Localisation : Ajaccio
Date d'inscription : 09/01/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Nouvelle interview   Jeu 5 Fév 2009 - 11:18

Pour Yngwie, c'est plus simple finalement maintenant... des ventes ridicules, moins d'argent, moins de problème avec le fisc...

_________________
under Yngwie’s masterful guidance !!!
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://nausica75.muxtape.com/
Invité
Invité



MessageSujet: Re: Nouvelle interview   Jeu 5 Fév 2009 - 16:09

T'as les chiffres?
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Invité
Invité



MessageSujet: Re: Nouvelle interview   Lun 15 Juin 2009 - 17:55

Interview vidéo de Malmsteen de 2003, bon faut comprendre le suédois Smile :
Vous remarquerez qu'il n'a vraiment pas le gros son, un son crunchy plutôt, en fait tout est dans ses doigts et le fait qu'il attaque parfois sévère, parfois plus doucement pour les accords!
Sinon il est super précis en live.
http://svtplay.se/v/1556024/en_traff_med_yngwie_malmsteen
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Nau J. Nau
Track: Angel of love
Track: Angel of love
avatar

Nombre de messages : 3858
Age : 40
Localisation : Ajaccio
Date d'inscription : 09/01/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Nouvelle interview   Mer 17 Juin 2009 - 13:24

je peux vous faire une traduction si vous voulez. Je regarderai l'interview et vous donnerai les grandes lignes ;-)

_________________
under Yngwie’s masterful guidance !!!
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://nausica75.muxtape.com/
Invité
Invité



MessageSujet: Re: Nouvelle interview   Lun 7 Fév 2011 - 14:52

Interview de Guitar Player de 2008, intéressante car le mec est un musicien et lui pose des questions très précises sur l'harmonie et sur ses techniques d'arrangements.
Pour une fois on a quelqu'un qui connait Malmsteen en profondeur.
Et on apprend que Caprici di Diablo a été fait en une prise Shocked

YNGWIE J. MALMSTEEN DOESN’T DO anything halfway. If he drives a car, it’s a classic Ferrari. When he wants an amp, he lines up a dozen vintage Marshall full-stacks. When he flicks a guitar pick in concert, he launches it to the back of the room. And when he tears your head off, he tears it clean off with the most dazzling technical command in the history of the guitar. As many times as it has been said, it bears repeating: Yes, Yngwie is that good. At a Guitar Player night at a San Francisco club, he not only floored all of the wide-eyed fans and pupils who were crowding the stage—he also dropped the jaws of the half a dozen grizzled, jaded GP editors in attendance. After a quarter century of Yngwie wannabes, clones, and detractors, it is nothing short of breathtaking to watch the genuine article do what he does. One has to laugh, because the Spinal Tapapproved puffy shirts, leather pants, and fog machines are damn funny at times. More often than not, though, you’ll laugh because it’s just not possible to play like that, with killing tone, flawless intonation, and an economy of motion that is second to none.

The Viking is back, with a shredding new album, Perpetual Flame [Rising Force]. Time has mellowed Malmsteen, who no longer feels the need to tout his own talents or talk about his contemporaries. He comes across as cool and confidant but not cocky, like a black belt who is so sure he can kick everyone’s ass that he doesn’t have to. Despite an exhausting day of back-to-back interviews and grueling rehearsals, he was animated and excited to talk about his recording process, why he prefers single-coils to humbuckers, and the surprising motto for his new record.


What was your overall concept for Perpetual Flame?

For the first time, I decided to not have a preconceived direction. I just let it flow. I have a little Marshall in front of the TV, and I’d sit and play all the time. If an idea came to me, I’d run upstairs and record it. The ideas could range from really heavy, fast Phrygian modes, which is what I’m kind of known for, to things that were a little bluesier, a little funkier. The normal procedure is to then go into the studio, put down live drums, and finish the whole thing. This time I didn’t do that. I took the ideas into the studio with the drummer, we recorded some songs, and then I went on the road. I listened to the stuff when I got back and it sounded completely different to me then. I did some more tunes, started tuning down, and got a little heavier. Then I went on the road again. I came back and heard things a little differently again. That’s when the melodies started taking shape. In other words, I didn’t start off with a direction at all. But, towards the end of it, I realized that the album was going in a very aggressive direction, with songs like “Death Dealer” and “Live to Fight (Another Day).” I liked working that way. You get a really cool perspective on things when you can go away from them for a while.

In “Live to Fight Another Day,” the first tonal center is C#.Then you move into Eb Phrygian Dominant. Then the solo modulates up a whole-step to F before you come back down to the original key. You get a big lift when you modulate up, but how do you avoid a letdown when you shift to a lower key?

I don’t look at it as a letdown. It just has to be done with conviction and it has to sound right. In the past, I would never stray from the rules of harmony for even one second. Every major/minor relation would be textbook stuff. But I’ve realized of late that it’s more dramatic to sometimes break away from that. I don’t like dissonance at all, but I do like to do key changes that are not the obvious ones. I’ll go from, say, Em to Gm, like I do on “Magic City.” There are other times where I go Em to G#m, which is a major third but from two minors, and it’s a very cool effect.

During the solo in “Live to Fight (Another Day),” it sounds like you quickly switch from the neck pickup to the bridge pickup. What’s your thought process behind that?

I do that on every solo on every record I’ve ever done. With the Strat it’s so easy to do. I’ve always been fond of that and it’s totally second nature, subconscious. I know that certain parts of the neck and certain arpeggios just sound better with the neck pickup and other things sound better with the bridge pickup. It’s like bowing on the violin. You naturally go toward whatever sounds more expressive, but I can’t tell you precisely. I’ve never sat down and analyzed it. When I was a kid, I would stay up all night and just play, but I wouldn’t play with an amp. Even back then, it was natural for me to switch back and forth, and my mom would yell from upstairs, “Stop doing this clicking stuff!” I do it with the amp on or with the amp off.

How did you create the different tones on the right and left sides in the intro to “Four Horsemen”?

I didn’t want to have a keyboard double the part. It’s an open-string riff on the A and D strings, so what I did was tune the G string up to an A and the B string up to a D and doubled the part an octave higher. Sometimes I will do some crazy stuff like that if it’s the only way I can hear what I want to hear, but I’ve never done that before. That’s the first time someone actually asked about that.

You make everything you do seem really easy, but please tell me that “Caprici di Diablo” is not easy for you to play.

Ha! I’ll tell you—that was the most demanding thing I’ve ever played. I was sweating bullets. I’ve never done such elaborate 6-string arpeggios before. I’m also doing a lot of chromatics. I really threw caution to the wind. I kept putting off recording it, and it got to the point where it was the only thing left to do on the record. If you listen to it, it’s really got nothing to hide behind. It’s bass, drums, and guitar. It’s very naked. In order to play something like that with drama and passion, I had to really go out on a limb.

How many takes did you do?

It was more or less one take and I went in and fixed a couple of things. My philosophy is this: I’d rather have a lot of fire and maybe one clam here or there. Nothing major, of course. I don’t want anything really bad on there. I could play it note perfect and exact, but I would look at that as very clinical, very cold. I figured I had to throw myself over the cliff, and I might land on something soft or I might not—but I knew I could go in and redo one or two notes. So that’s how I did it. It’s not perfect, and that’s kind of what I wanted.

Your intonation has always been flawless, despite the fact that you play on scalloped fretboards that make it easy to squeeze notes out of tune. What’s your secret?

The secret is no secret at all: Play with your ears. Use your ears and record yourself. That’s it. And when you hear that it sounds good, that’s when it’s good. Forget what the fingers are doing. Forget about the picking and all that. If it sounds good, it doesn’t matter how you do it. Growing up, everybody in my family was so musical and the one thing that wasn’t allowed in our house was singing or playing out of tune. It was a pretty pitch-conscious household. It’s always been a priority of mine.

You’re known for getting great Strat tones. What are some non-Strat tones that you like?

I think Van Halen had a really cool sound when he came out. I love Allan Holdsworth. And Brian May—come on! He’s the tonemeister from hell. I love all those tones, but I realized early on that my playing—and my way of approaching the instrument—would always sound better with single-coils. With the double-coils, the definition is never going to be the same because of the magnetic window. It’s a wider magnetic field, you know? You’re picking up more of the string, which means it’s going to be less defined. That’s physics. You can’t change that. So, my DiMarzio YJM pickup is a humbucker, but with one row of magnets.

You’ve got chops mastered. What do you struggle with as a musician?

When you get to a certain level, like in my case, it is a challenge just to keep it up and not slack off. I don’t look at it as a challenge as much as just what I have to do. I wouldn’t accept anything less. Of course I play badly now and again, but I do try to maintain a certain level. Every time I pick up the guitar though—and I was playing right before I talked to you— it feels great. I find that very exciting. I still love to step onstage and go for it like there’s no tomorrow. All guns blazing! I had a motto on this album: More is more. I disagree that less is more. Less is less, and more is more.





Revenir en haut Aller en bas
coolviolin
Track: The Bogeyman
Track: The Bogeyman
avatar

Nombre de messages : 354
Age : 43
Date d'inscription : 26/10/2008

MessageSujet: Re: Nouvelle interview   Lun 7 Fév 2011 - 15:22

J'aime bien cette interview.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Invité
Invité



MessageSujet: Re: Nouvelle interview   Lun 7 Fév 2011 - 21:42

Yngwie J. Malmsteen: King's Diamonds
By Joe Lalaina
Yngwie J. Malmsteen


Originally printed in Guitar World, July 2008

In this album overview, Yngwie reveals the untold stories behind his crowning achievements.

Ca sent la bio non?


Steeler [1983]I emigrated to the U.S. on February 3, 1983, when I was 19 years old. I joined Steeler right away and recorded the album the following month. I’d been playing in bands in Sweden since the age of 11, but Steeler was my first album. I had no idea it would be released on a record label called Shrapnel. All I knew was I’d be playing in a band called Steeler.

“The album was recorded outside of San Francisco in Cotati, California, on a farm that has a recording studio called Prairie Sun Studios. Except for the guitar parts, the other instruments were recorded before I joined the band. I was anxious to record my parts, but [Shrapnel Records owner] Mike Varney told me I had to wait until he got my work papers before I could do so. My papers arrived a few weeks later, and I had to record all the guitar parts in one day! I remember Varney saying, ‘We just got your work permit. Go in there and play.’ It wasn’t really much of a toil, because I was used to working at such a hectic pace anyway. I used my 1971 ‘Duck’ Stratocaster on the album, which I played on all my albums until the early Nineties.

“Steeler was a good start for my career. They didn’t play anything dangerous—everything was formulaic—but I played all this crazy stuff on top of it, and that turned out to be an interesting combination. But by the time Steeler came out, I was already out of the band.”


Alcatrazz No Parole from Rock 'n' Roll [1983] “I joined Alcatrazz a month after I recorded Steeler. The big difference between Steeler and Alcatrazz is that in Alcatrazz I wrote the songs. When I went to the Alcatrazz audition, they had no songs and no direction. They also had a questionable drummer. They offered me the gig on the spot, but that same day I got another offer from [UFO vocalist] Phil Mogg, who wanted to get UFO going again after Michael Schenker had left to form his own band. I told Mogg I’d get back to him. I felt it would be too much of a gamble to work with him; at least Alcatrazz had a lineup and a manager.

“I told the guys in Alcatrazz I’d join if they’d get a new drummer, and they obliged. But the main thing that made me go with them was the fact that they had no songs. I wanted to write them, so that’s what I did.

“Alcatrazz got to play right away, and by January 1984 we were headlining in Japan. Everything all happened at once for me—I didn’t know what was going on! I remember walking out of my hotel room in Tokyo and there’d be a throng of people waiting for me in the lobby. It was like Beatlemania! After I got back from Japan with Alcatrazz, we toured in the States with Ted Nugent, which gave us some great exposure.”


Yngwie J. Malmsteen's Rising Force [1984] “The concept behind Alcatrazz was that [vocalist] Graham Bonnet would be the star, and the band was built around him. But without intending to, I became the most popular member, which created some friction among the other guys.

“When Alcatrazz played in Japan in early ’84, the record label offered me the opportunity to do a solo album while continuing to play in the band. I wanted the whole album to have vocals, but the record company didn’t want that. Initially, the album was released solely in Japan. Months later, Polygram released it in the U.S. It spent nearly a year on the Billboard chart and was nominated for a Grammy for Best Rock Instrumental performance [in 1985].

“I began recording Rising Force with [keyboardist] Jens Johansson while I was on tour with Alcatrazz. When we had a few days off, I’d fly out to L.A. and record a couple of solos at the Record Plant and then be back in time for the next gig. A few of the songs were on the demo I sent Varney, like ‘Black Star’ and ‘Now Your Ships Are Burned.’ I don’t think Rising Force is my best album, but there are some cool tracks on it. I’ll probably play ‘Far Beyond the Sun’ and ‘Black Star’ until the day I die.”


Marching Out [1985] “Upon completing Rising Force I went straight into the studio to do Marching Out, with the intention that it would be my first U.S. solo album. But Rising Force had already beat it to the punch because it was rush-released.

“Marching Out is a pretty straightforward heavy metal album, but with insanely over-the-top guitar playing. Most of the songs were written specifically for it, except for 'Soldier without Faith’ and ‘Anguish and Fear,’ which I wrote in Sweden when I was a kid.

“A lot of the songs came together when I was living in a suburban home in L.A.’s San Fernando Valley with [drummer] Anders Johansson and his brother Jens. We set up Marshall stacks and a drum set and played in the middle of the night! As you can imagine, the neighbors weren’t happy.”


Trilogy [1986] “This album is special to me because I focused specifically on writing good songs and less on crazy guitar solos. ‘You Don’t Remember, I’ll Never Forget,’ ‘The Fury’ and ‘Magic Mirror’ are songs I’m still quite proud of. I still play ‘You Don’t Remember’ every night onstage; it’s the only tune I ever wrote on keyboards. ‘Trilogy Suite Op:5’ is a pretty out-of-control instrumental. The main riff is a fast Phrygian run that I’ve played for years. A lot of the other trademarks of my style are in that track, things like diminished, chromatic, harmonic minor and Aeolian pentatonic runs.

“Marcel Jacob played bass on Marching Out, but I played all the bass parts on Trilogy and pretty much every album since. Playing bass myself, I found out, is usually best because it’s easier to do it myself than teach my bass parts to another musician—I don’t have the patience for that. By doing it myself, I bring the guitar, bass and drums together in a more compact way. Plus, I enjoy playing bass.”


Eclipse [1990] “After coming off a very long tour for Odyssey [1988], I released Trial by Fire: Live in Leningrad [1989], an album recorded in an 18,000-seat arena long before other rock bands played in the Soviet Union. I played nine nights in Leningrad and 11 in Moscow.

“Then I moved to Miami and made Eclipse, an album which I really like. I recorded it with a fresh group of all-Swedish musicians, assembling it from songs that were lying around. Like Trilogy, it’s a song-oriented endeavor. There are some interesting songs on Eclipse, like ‘Faultline,’ which is about living near the San Andreas Fault and the earthquakes people encounter, and ‘Bedroom Eyes,’ which has a cool bluesy guitar solo. I remember saying to Fletcher, ‘We need to cut a solo for ‘Bedroom Eyes,’ but he told me we already had one. I said, ‘What do you mean?’ Unbeknownst to me, he taped me playing when I was jamming and it’s the guitar solo which appears on the song. Overall, Eclipse is fresh sounding because I was living in a new place and had a new band. It felt so good to be out of L.A. and away from earthquakes.”


The Seventh Sign [1994] “The Seventh Sign was put together quite differently than my previous records. We recorded a lot of the rhythm parts while playing to a click track rather than a drummer, and ‘Pyramid of Cheops’ was the first song I ever recorded in which I down-tuned. Although I used a Bob Bradshaw rack for Odyssey, Eclipse, and its follow-up, Fire & Ice [1992], I stopped using it on this album because I realized it’s better for onstage use— I’m more of a straight-into-the-amp guy so in the studio I just don’t need it. I just like to color my tone with a couple of Boss pedals.”

Inspiration [1996] “In the midst of an extensive tour for Magnum Opus [1995], I decided to have a state-of-the-art recording studio built in my Miami home. When I got off tour in January 1996, it was there waiting for me. I called some of my musician friends and invited them to come down and record. I named the album Inspiration because I covered songs that inspired me as a kid. ‘Pictures of Home,’ ‘Mistreated,’ ‘Demon’s Eye’ and ‘Child in Time’ have always been some of my favorite Deep Purple songs. Ritchie Blackmore was my biggest inspiration as a kid, so that’s why there are more of his songs on the album than anybody else’s. Inspiration was recorded on a two-inch-tape Studer, which at the time was the Rolex of analog mastering machines. Now it’s obsolete.”

Alchemy [1999] “After making the formulaic-sounding Facing the Animal [1997] with [deceased] drummer Cozy Powell—bless his soul!—I decided I was going to throw caution to the wind and not take the easy way out. With Alchemy, I pulled out all the stops. It features some of my sickest instrumental work! Unfortunately, I’m not entirely pleased with the sound of the record. “Everything about my style is packed onto this album. It kicks off with an insane instrumental, ‘Blitzkrieg,’ and doesn’t let up. ‘Blue’ is one of my all-time favorite instrumentals; it proves that you don’t have to play pentatonic scales to sound bluesy. There are some cool minor scales and nice wah-wah work on it. Overall, Alchemy is far more extreme than any of my previous records as far as technical craziness. The album is as over-the-top—and all the way out, and then some—as you can get.”

Concerto Suite Live with the New Japan Philharmonic Orchestra [2002] “I’m more proud of this live version of the album than the studio release [Concerto Suite for Electric Guitar and Orchestra in E Flat Minor Op. 1—1998]. Whereas the studio album was written at a leisurely pace, this album was recorded in one go with no rehearsals. After playing some dates for War to End All Wars [2000] in England, I hopped a flight to Tokyo and had to pull off this performance the following day. Not only that, but prior to my arrival the orchestra had arranged several of my earlier tracks, so I had to play their arrangements on the spot. Then they told me they’d be filming the show. Man, was I stressed, but I went onstage and nailed it! This work may be my crowning achievement.”

Unleash the Fury [2005] “The title stemmed from an incident that happened on an overseas flight to Japan with my band in 1987. We were sitting in first class, getting hammered, and doing nasty things like tossing sanitary napkins with Bloody Mary mix around. We were drunken idiots! These days, I’m as sober as a nun. After a few hours of being assholes, we fall asleep. Then [vocalist] Joe Lynn Turner and I were awakened by some lady who pours a pitcher of ice water on us. One of my band members with a weird, twisted mind decided to record the fiasco and the whole incident of me screaming at the top of my lungs appeared on the internet in 2002. I screamed at the lady, ‘You unleashed the fuckin’ fury,’ so I decided to title an album after my rant. It’s my most notorious album title, thanks to the web.”
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Invité
Invité



MessageSujet: Re: Nouvelle interview   Mar 15 Mar 2011 - 2:47

Yngwie a commenté la catastrophe sismique japonaise sur son myspace:


I wanted to personally write about the huge earthquake and tsunami in Japan. My prayers are with everyone in Japan! Seeing all of this footage in Japan is truly devastating!! Please help the people of Japan by texting REDCROSS to 90999 to make a $10 donation. God Bless. Yngwie Malmsteen"

http://newsroom.redcross.org/2010/05/03/text-redcross-to-90999/
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
tonton J. franck
Track: Angel of love
Track: Angel of love
avatar

Nombre de messages : 3538
Age : 46
Localisation : entre Fés et Reykjavik
Date d'inscription : 24/12/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Nouvelle interview   Mar 13 Sep 2011 - 16:21

Une très intéressante interview du jeune Yngwie en 1986:
http://www.guitarworld.com/yngwie-malmsteen-discusses-his-roots-his-rep-and-his-latest-album-1986-guitar-world-interview?page=0,0

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://lazizikatonton.blogspot.com/
Chopine Boy
Track: Alone in paradise
Track: Alone in paradise
avatar

Nombre de messages : 719
Age : 46
Localisation : Bourges
Date d'inscription : 01/04/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Nouvelle interview   Mer 5 Oct 2011 - 14:41

Une anecdote qui m'était inconnue, Yngwie explique pourquoi il joue si vite

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.myspace.com/mimiguitarproject
tonton J. franck
Track: Angel of love
Track: Angel of love
avatar

Nombre de messages : 3538
Age : 46
Localisation : entre Fés et Reykjavik
Date d'inscription : 24/12/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Nouvelle interview   Mer 5 Oct 2011 - 14:58

Oh ben Chopinou, c'est connu comme le loup blanc ça!!! Wink
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://lazizikatonton.blogspot.com/
Chopine Boy
Track: Alone in paradise
Track: Alone in paradise
avatar

Nombre de messages : 719
Age : 46
Localisation : Bourges
Date d'inscription : 01/04/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Nouvelle interview   Mer 5 Oct 2011 - 20:51

L'histoire de la bande jouée pas à la bonne vitesse ? nan, j'en n'avais pas entendu parler… mais toi tu es un true fan fils du metal, Frankie Razz
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.myspace.com/mimiguitarproject
Little Pyngwie
Track: Soldier Without Faith
Track: Soldier Without Faith
avatar

Nombre de messages : 23
Date d'inscription : 24/09/2011

MessageSujet: Re: Nouvelle interview   Mer 5 Oct 2011 - 21:26

Quelqu'un peut m'expliquer cette histoire de bande ralentie ?
J'ai rien capté ...
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
coolviolin
Track: The Bogeyman
Track: The Bogeyman
avatar

Nombre de messages : 354
Age : 43
Date d'inscription : 26/10/2008

MessageSujet: Re: Nouvelle interview   Mer 5 Oct 2011 - 21:41

Little Pyngwie a écrit:
Quelqu'un peut m'expliquer cette histoire de bande ralentie ?
J'ai rien capté ...

Il s'enregistrait avec un appareil A dans un endroit.
Puis il écoutait ailleurs la bande avec un appareil B qui faisait défiler plus rapidement la bande, sans savoir que les vitesses de lecture étaient différentes.
Il essayait alors de rejouer ce qu'il entendait avec l'appareil B à la même vitesse...
Puisqu'il recommençait régulièrement ce processus, il dit que ça le poussait à toujours jouer plus vite.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Little Pyngwie
Track: Soldier Without Faith
Track: Soldier Without Faith
avatar

Nombre de messages : 23
Date d'inscription : 24/09/2011

MessageSujet: Re: Nouvelle interview   Mer 5 Oct 2011 - 22:41

Ah d'accord merci ! Sacré Malmy ...
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: Nouvelle interview   

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Nouvelle interview
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 3 sur 3Aller à la page : Précédent  1, 2, 3
 Sujets similaires
-
» Nouvelle interview Al'Tarba sur ABCDRDUSON
» Nouvelle interview Ben Bass
» [Info] Bill : nouvelle coiffure, nouveau style : photos !
» La petite nouvelle: Saranayde
» [Interview] Chat sur Habbo.it : "Gustav & Georg sont là, près de moi"

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
 :: Yngwie J. Malmsteen :: Yngwie news-
Sauter vers: